Driving to Old Songs

Singing to the 60s and 70s music with the family

Melody

--

“Lucy in the sky with diamonds!” my four kids and I shouted as I drove up I-5 toward Oregon. That’s how we rolled. We sang and listened to tunes. Many times it was a Beatles song because the Beatles are always my favorites, but my boys also love the Grateful Dead and Led Zeppelin, and Pink Floyd. My favorite Pink Floyd song is “Wish You Were Here,” and my favorite Led Zeppelin song is, “Brom-Y Your Stomp” on their more acoustic Led Zeppelin III album. So everyone is happy. My youngest daughter Megan, who is only around four years old loves it all, but I know when she gets older, she will form her own opinions. The first song she sang on her own was “Hello Good-Bye,” a Beatles song she must’ve heard dozens of times. I lose track.

One day while driving somewhere, “Hello Good-Bye” played on the radio and Megan sang along word-for-word and it was so cute. A couple of my older kids were in the car and they said, “Awwww!” She knew the whole song, and I don’t remember teaching it to her. She had just listened to it. We were all excited about how fast little Megan picked up on the music. I remember she was still sitting in a car seat so she could not have been much older than three or four at the time. My little redheaded girl just went with the flow, unlike my moody, wild three teenagers who could be wonderful, scary, and moody all in one day or even one hour or minute at times. I felt like I was in control as a parent, even a single parent with four kids when the older kids were still in elementary school. Then one after another, the pre-teen began with moodiness and just slightly pushing away from me, and then the full-on teenager status appeared as if out of nowhere. Suddenly, your kid thinks you don’t know anything at all, especially my older daughter Melissa who went from my sweet, helpful angel child to this moody, Gothic teenager who rolled her eyes and gave me dirty looks almost every day. What happened?

Anyway, one thing we always shared no matter what my kids went through was the music — and it happened a lot when they rode with me in the car because they were forced to be in the same area as me and to up in their rooms with the door shut doing who knows what, especially when their friends visited. It got to the point where I was afraid to walk into the…

--

--

Melody

Writer of Creative Nonfiction and Fiction; Ukulele Player; Lover of the Beatles, rock n’ roll, and the 1960s. Mom & Grandma; lives in Eugene, OR with BF & cat.